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Stop Believing

Original post August 11, 2022 @ 9:08am

Did anyone else start singing, “Don’t Stop Believing?”

The first words that came to mind as I input words onto the internet (can’t quite call this typing, can’t quite call this writing… thumbing? Anyways..) were “Don’t stop believing.” But I’m here to tell you to stop believing.

Stop believing you can do this alone

Stop trying to do this by yourself

If you’re crying and your heart is hurting

Keep on going, but

Stop trying to do this by yourself

Stop believing you can do this alone

The hardest part of recovery for me right now is complete honesty. Honesty with when I need to pray and ask for help. Honesty with when I need to reach out and tell someone I’m not okay.

Why is this so difficult?

Pride is my first thought… sarcasm is my second thought. I don’t use sarcasm as much anymore, buy I am very prideful. I often want to do things alone or on my own. These are the times most crucial to reach out, first in prayer. Elder Jeffrey R. Holland states,

It will be required of each of us to kneel when we may not want to kneel, to bow when we may not want to bow, to confess when we may not want to confess—perhaps a confession born of painful experience that God’s thoughts are not our thoughts, neither are his ways our ways, saith the Lord (see Isaiah 55:8).

[We must] “yield to the enticings of the Holy Spirit,” and “through the atonement of Christ . . . becometh as a child, submissive, meek, humble, patient, full of love, willing to submit to all things which the Lord seeth fit to inflict upon him, even as a child doth submit to his father” (Mosiah 3:19

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

Stop believing you can do it on your own.

Recovery will come if you start believing you need to ask for help. First, in the form of prayer. Seek the Lord’s guiding hand then move forward with what you feel prompted to do.

It’s hard, especially if you’ve been hurt, abused, or experienced any form of trauma. You may need to seek help from a competent counselor and/or medical professional. Prayer, Honesty, and truth-telling with yourself, first, will lead you to more truth, peace, and joy. It won’t be easy. It will be hard, but it will be worth it. In the name of Jesus Christ, amen.

Pursuit of the Eternal

The Lord is seeking men [and women] like Nehemiah—… who fulfill the oath and covenant of the priesthood. He seeks to enlist unfaltering souls who diligently go about the work of building the kingdom of God—those who, when faced with opposition and temptation, say in their hearts, “I am doing a great work and cannot come down.”
When faced with trial and suffering, they respond, “I am doing a great work and cannot come down.”
When faced with ridicule and reproach, they proclaim, “I am doing a great work and cannot come down.”
Our Heavenly Father seeks those who refuse to allow the trivial to hinder them in their pursuit of the eternal. He seeks those who will not allow the attraction of ease or the traps of the adversary to distract them from the work He has given them to perform. He seeks those whose actions conform to their words—those who say with conviction, “I am doing a great work and cannot come down.”

We Are Doing a Great Work and Cannot Come Down

Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf
Of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. exerpt taken from April 2009 General Conference address, “We Are Doing a Great Work and Cannot Come Down.”

How Do you Respond When….

Sept 2, 2022 10:14 PM Updated

[May 9, 2022, 7:31 AM]

So, I’ve been struggling a long while with addiction. Which I’ve come to wonder if there’s a cycle of addiction, anxiety, and depression. Throw ADD in their and wallah, chaos. Which seems to have been my life for a long time.

I wondered if I couldn’t just “faith” my way through this. Is it not true that “true doctrine understood changes attitudes and behavior quicker than the study of behavior improves behavior?” (Boyd K. Packer). Well… the healthy need no physician. Whereas me.. I have been deathly ill mentally for over 2 decades. I likely need professional mental help.

It’s like caring for our teeth. If we’re not flossing and brushing daily, there will be consequences. A root canal may be needed and if this is the case, we wouldn’t attempt to work on the tooth ourselves. Personally, I would want someone who is educated and who has practiced many years in their profession.



——-STORY OF HOW TOOTH PAIN CAN’T ALWAYS BE FIXED WITH FLOSSING AND BRUSHING——–

If we seek Him we will find Him. And the Lord taught me the importance of professional help through a painful experience I had with my tooth.

My tooth was in pain and discolored. I thought I needed to brush more or floss more. I even began gargling with liquid garlic and coconut oil, thinking I could help my own tooth.

Finally, I was in so much pain, and one family member said something about my discolored tooth. She thought it may be an abscess and should get it looked at by the dentist right away because she had a similar experience.

I trusted her experience, and her witness of my situation. I went to the dentist, and he said I needed a root canal! There is no way I would have attempted to remove my own tooth. I needed the professional help of someone who works with teeth.

Like our mental health, symptomatic anger can mean theres pain we cannot heal on our own. Yes we need the Savior’s atoning blood and sacrifice, daily, but he has given us tools through professionals, so we can be agents for ourselves, and not be acted upon by our emotions.

Sometimes mental health can be a matter of flossing and brushing ones teeth. Other times, there’s a cavity, and if gone untreated can go deep into the roots and cause deep-rooted pain that requires medicine and eventual drilling out the tooth if the cavity affects the nerves.

I have learned the importance of following the prophets. Personal revelation is important, but if it contradicts revelation from prophets and apostles, check the source and pay close attention to your “gut instinct.” If something feels off, check your source. Is it fear-based or faith-based? Is it cringy or confirming? Does it edify or bring contention? When in doubt, follow the Prophet who, for our day as of today, is President Russel M. Nelson. I don’t know for myself yet, that he truly is the Lord’s prophet, but I believe it’s true. I believe its true that he does receive revelation to lead and guide Christ’s Restored Church, today, and I believe it’s the Lord who is leading and guiding the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in these days.

As Elder Jeffrey R. Holland Of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints has said,


How do you best respond when mental or emotional challenges confront you or those you love? Above all,

Never lose faith in your Father in Heaven,

Never doubt that Heavenly Father loves you more than you can comprehend.

[Believe] That [His] love never changes. …

[Believe His love] is there for you when you are sad or happy, discouraged or hopeful.

[Believe] God’s love is there for you whether or not you feel you deserve [it]. It is simply always there.”

Never harden your heart.

Faithfully pursue the time-tested devotional practices that bring the Spirit of the Lord into your life.

Seek the counsel of those who hold keys for your spiritual well-being.

Ask for and cherish priesthood blessings.

Take the sacrament every week,

hold fast to the perfecting promises of the Atonement of Jesus Christ.

Believe in miracles

[Believe that] Hope is never lost.

[Believe that] If those miracles do not come soon or fully or seemingly at all, remember the Savior’s own anguished example:

[Believe that] if the bitter cup does not pass, drink it and be strong, trusting in happier days ahead.

Elder Jeffrey R. Holland
Of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

He then goes on to counsel what direction to take of things aren’t getting better, saying,

If things continue to be debilitating, seek the advice of reputable people with certified training, professional skills, and good values. Be honest with them about your history and your struggles. Prayerfully and responsibly consider the counsel they give and the solutions they prescribe. If you had appendicitis, God would expect you to seek a priesthood blessing and get the best medical care available. So too with emotional disorders. Our Father in Heaven expects us to use all of the marvelous gifts He has provided in this glorious dispensation.

Like a Broken Vessel

So. Here I go. After several years of understanding that I need therapy, I’m finally trying to move forward and not just faithing it alone because this is a root canal of a problem, not a matter of flossing more, brushing more, and eating less sugar.

I believe in the power of prayer, priesthood blessings, inspiration and the Holy Ghost. I believe God speaks to me, His daughter, and I can have access to His power as I am meek, submissive, become as a child, and seek to know His will for me. As I have tested the words of both ancient and modern day prophets, I have come to learn for myself the importance of keeping the commandments, repenting and seeking to do The Fathers will and not my own. It’s hard, but know that through the atoning blood and sacrifice of Jesus Christ, we can change forever. In the name of Jesus Christ. Amen.

May 11, 2022 10:32am I may owe you, as the reader an apology if I’ve lead you astray.

Move Forward

Original post Oct. 21, 2018

Updated Feb 17, 2022

Photo by Анна Рыжкова from Pexels

It may seem easier to be complacent, but why would I want to remain complacent or “comfortable” when I am meant to progress, learn and grow?

Well, for one… it’s hard! I’m still learning how to overcome behaviors and habits that hinder my ability to have the constant companionship of the Holy Ghost, which ultimately allows me to receive direction and inspiration in my life (D&C 121:45–46; D&C 20:37, Doctrine & Covenants; Moroni 4:3, Book of Mormon).

I’m going through the Addiction Recovery Program (ARP) through The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints for the third time because I just want to progress; I want to move on and move forward in my life. I’ve struggled with an eating disorder for as long as I can remember. I never saw it as a problem, but from the time I was a kid. I was doing what many kids do- steal candy from our parents’ closet and binge eat on candy, sweets and treats from Halloween to Christmas and Valentines day to Easter. These rituals seemed to focus on binge eating and secrecy.

Eventually I began binge eating then extreme dieting and rigorous workout regimes during my adolescence. I was obsessed with food, diet and exercise. It haunted my thoughts constantly, and took away time I could invest with loved ones or creating or doing something worthwhile. Instead, I chose to fill my time with activities that “numb” my mind from the anxiety I felt with daily stressors.

Stress is a part of life, and stress is not unhealthy. I recently learned that stress causes the same physical response in your body as excitement; however, the only thing that changes is how I’m perceiving the stress. If I tell my brain, “I’m freaking out” then my body reacts negatively with anxiety. If I tell my brain “everything is okay” then my body reacts accordingly.

When I experience some advanced form of stress in my life, I would turn to habits to numb my mind. In 2018, when I first created this post, when even the tiniest bit of stress showed itself, I typically didn’t think twice before I went straight to spiritually destructive patterns. I had (and continue to have) a desires to change, and I believed I could through Jesus Christ. If we’re struggling with any addiction whether it’s alcohol, drugs, anger, eating, watching shows, listening to music, having unhealthy thoughts or anything that drives the spirit away; I know there’s hope to overcome these patterns, but we must always be honest with ourselves.

Here’s a link to step 1 for ARP

https://www.lds.org/media-library/video/2012-12-001-step-one-honesty?lang=eng

autumn-trail-georgia-918492-gallery (2)
Fall Time in Georgia

References:

Addiction Recovery Program. https://addictionrecovery.lds.org/addiction-recovery-program-guide?lang=eng

Photo. Web accessed. https://www.lds.org/media-library/images/category/fall?lang=eng

Perfection Pending

Original Post March 18, 2018 4:17 PM

Revised updated Feb 17. 2022 10:42 AM

Photo by Darina Belonogova from Pexels

Today in Relief Society, the sisters shared stories about how many folks online create this appearance of perfection through social media which causes us to look at our lives through a tainted lens. Not all posts are this way. I have seen others that are filled with complaints, venting, and other negative outbursts. I believe we are to share and bear one another’s burdens, but continuously reading rants and raves is drains my mind.

In many posts I’ve seen, the person’s life is captured and captioned in one perfect moment for all too see. As I followed these posts, I was left feeling aggravated, agitated, anxious, low, sad, secluded, isolated and did not realize I was allowing myself to wallow in these emotions. Each time I would stare at a friend’s, or even stranger’s post with Pinterest perfect hair, clothes, home, food and life, my brain registered, “You’re not good enough because you’re life doesn’t look like this.”

I’d view friend’s postings of marriage, engagements, or new friendships developed, and I would think, “What’s wrong with me?” It was so subtle, but I didn’t realize I was developing a dangerous cycle of thinking. Friends would say, “Did you see about so-and-so’s post??” referring to a new relationship, break-up or engagement. Somewhere inside, I felt hurt that I found out about a close friends engagement through someone else. This seemed to be a regular basis for quite some time, especially going through college. Social media is so great, but I’ve learned that I must be careful with it.

I was raised a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints; however, I was inactive for a time. I traveled the beaten path because I was nonconformist. I didn’t believe in following the traditions of my family because it just wasn’t for me. I was never big into certain social media practices such as Facebook or Twitter, but when I came back to church nearly 3 years ago I felt very strongly to get rid of my Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram. It was so hard in the beginning, but I came across the scripture that read, “No man, having put his hand to the plough, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God” [Luke 9:62]. I had many triggers, and one of them was seeing others from my past. I didn’t realize how bad my cycle of thinking was until I got a Venmo recently and saw transactions between friends with little drinking emojis, and thought “Oh look..” I shake my head at the thought. Yes thoughts of drinking still haunt me, but I am learning my triggers and am trying to be every so careful. Social media is a trigger, so that is one area that I may have to avoid for a while.

We live in an amazing time. Elder David A Bendnar states that,

“We are blessed to live, learn, and serve in this most remarkable dispensation. An important aspect of the fullness that is available to us in this special season is a miraculous progression of innovations and inventions that have enabled and accelerated the work of salvation: from trains to telegraphs to radios to automobiles to airplanes to telephones to transistors to televisions to computers to satellite transmissions to the Internet—and to an almost endless list of technologies and tools that bless our lives. All of these advancements are part of the Lord hastening His work in the latter days” [To Sweep the Earth as with a Flood, Elder David A. Bednar,Campus Education Week at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah].

The draining emotion I felt, was coming from my actions and my thinking. I must try to focus on the positive and focus on the joy we are meant to experience in this life ( 2 Nephi 2: 25). President Russel M Nelson taught

“When comparing one’s personal performance with the supreme standard of the Lord’s expectation, the reality of imperfection can at times be depressing. My heart goes out to conscientious Saints who, because of their shortcomings, allow feelings of depression to rob them of happiness in life” [OCTOBER 1995 General conference address].

I’m trying to remember to find the joy in the journey.

“Life is to be enjoyed, not just endured.” -Gordon B Hinckley

Step 1 – Honesty

Originally published: May 10th 2020

I have been suffering from addiction for nearly 20 years. My addiction began out of curiosity and was fueled by secrecy, rebellion, and the high. In taking the first step to be honest, I had to be honest with the one person I’ve deceived the longest, myself.

Step 1 – HONESTY
KEY PRINCIPLE: Admit that you, of yourself, are powerless to overcome your addictions and that your life has become unmanageable

The ARP manual is located at the end of this post or available here.

I did not realize that my dishonesty with myself and others solidfied my addiction. I’ve not met a single person who didn’t first decieve themselves before becoming addicted to some substance or harmful habit later.

Overcoming Addiction One Step at a Time

Because I was addicted to multiple substances and harmful habits, I couldn’t see where I was or where I needed to go. I couldn’t see I was miserable. I couldn’t see my addiction lead my life and that I was no longer in control of my fate.

Russell M. Nelson of the [Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints] observed: “Addiction surrenders later freedom to choose. Through chemical means, one can literally become disconnected from his or her own will” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1988, 7; or Ensign, Nov. 1988, 7).

Once I began being honest with myself, I realized I wanted a family. I wanted to be with people I trusted, and I  wanted to be trusted. I wanted a husband I knew was honest, and I wanted all of this for the children I would bring into this world too. It was a hard decision to disconnect from those tying me to my addiction, but to this day, I can’t believe where I am, and I know I didn’t get here on my own.

I chose to follow the ARP’s manual to my best ability, I attended meetings in person, and I listened to the videos and life stories of recovering addicts. After graduating with my Bachelors of Science in Marriage and Family Studies, I couldn’t help but thank the Lord for all he has done to help me get where I am today. As other’s congratulated me on my accomplishments, I would repeat this scripture because there is no way I could have done this without the good Lord.

“I do not boast in my own strength, nor in my own
wisdom; but behold, my joy is full, yea, my heart is
brim with joy, and I will rejoice in my God.

Yea, I know that I am nothing; as to my strength
I am weak; therefore I will not boast of myself, but
I will boast of my God, for in his strength I can do all
things.”

Ammon (see Alma 26:11–12).

I know that because of the atonement of Jesus Christ, I was able to be strengthened to choose to be honest with myself. Because I try to be honest with myself and rely on the Savior’s merits, mercy, and grace,  I am here.  I still make mistakes and there is still trial and hardship, but life is better. I have more peace, more joy, and more happiness living my life this way. Through Jesus Christ’s atoning sacrifice, I have been able to be honest, and that’s the first step to recovery.

_____________________________________________________________________________

I was first introduced to the Addiction Recovery Program (ARP) Manual at age 18. In the last 11 years, I’ve tried and failed many times to overcome multiple addictions, but “no failure ever need be final” (Thomas S. Monson). I began accomplishing more than I could imagine once I tried to learn true doctrine, true principle, and apply what I’ve learned in this manual. I have been able to abstain from multiple destructive behaviors for over 4 years and have experienced for myself and know that  The study of the doctrines of the gospel will improve behavior quicker than a study of behavior will improve behavior. “Boyd K. Packer

Step 4: Truth – Make a Fearless Moral Written Inventory

I glory in plainness; I glory in truth; I glory in my Jesus, for he hath redeemed my soul from hell.

Nephi

I’ve been working on step 4 across a five year period. I’ve completed the 12 steps in the Addiction Recovery Program (ARP) through the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints once in 12 years. I’ve restarted the Program several times, but tend to get stuck on step 4.

It seems self-abusive patterns sneak back into my life when things get hard. As I took step 4, I discovered underlying emotions and beliefs that were symptomatic of pride, envy, bitterness, and resentment. I learned the importance to supplement each day with gratitude, faith, prayer, and scripture study. Other vital steps include striving to remember my divine heritage as a child of God, striving to counsel with the Lord, and striving to follow promptings I receive. These daily practices help me step away from addiction and step toward Jesus Christ.

SELF-ABUSE

I’ve experienced varying forms of sobriety. In 20 years, this is the longest length of time I’ve resisted temptation, including self-abusive patterns, yet many days I make choices which slide me back to neglect my needs whether temporal, spiritual, or emotional.

I used to physically harm my body, especially during the ages of 15-17. Now, when I self-abuse, it’s in a verbal/emotional form. I look in the mirror or sit on the sofa and listen to the thoughts pick apart my body, my looks, my character, and who I am as a person. I could choose to walk away, I could choose to hum a favorite hymn or familiar tune, but when I’m tired, weary, and worn down, it becomes increasingly difficult to battle the adversary’s blasts of attempts to tear me down.

When we listen to the harmful thoughts, it engages our minds in an emotional self-destructive warfare. We have the ability to choose to tune our mind differently, but we must become aware of what’s happening. Typically, these patterns have seed in our childhood, are immensely difficult to break, and cannot be done alone.

To overcome these harmful cycles, Step 4 deals with telling the truth and making a fearless written moral inventory. It doesn’t mean we won’t have fear in writing our inventory.

The following ARP passages have helped me to navigate difficult memories as I’ve worked on my personal inventory:

Look beyond your past behaviors and examine the thoughts, feelings, and beliefs that led to your behavior. Your thoughts, feelings, and beliefs are actually the roots of your addictive behaviors. 

Unless you examine all your tendencies toward fear, pride, resentment, anger, self-will, and self-pity, your abstinence will be shaky at best.

ARP – STEP 4

REFLECTION ON ADDICTION

This last week, abusive thoughts and temptations infiltrated my mind more often than usual. I’ve been dealing with sickness and lack of sleep. It seems these are times when harmful thoughts are most prevalent. Regardless, I continued to work on my inventory and came to realize how mentally crippling beliefs, attitudes, and emotions affected my destructive decisions.

I was concsciously unaware of feelings, thoughts, and beliefs which existed and continue to influence my reactions, but as I’ve addressed them and made a physical copy of my inventory, I’ve slowly begun to process examine these tendencies in the situations that come to my mind. Prayer and trusting the Lord through your process is key.

GRATITUDE

In his 96 years, President Russell M. Nelson of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has seen many trials. But he says there’s a simple remedy to help us find joy in hard times—gratitude.

President Russell M. Nelson on the Healing Power of Gratitude

Gratitude precedes miracles. Thomas S. Monson, 16th President of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, described the following biblical experience to illustrate this truth:

In the book of Matthew in the Bible, we have another account of gratitude, this time as an expression from the Savior. As He traveled in the wilderness for three days, more than 4,000 people followed and traveled with Him. He took compassion on them, for they may not have eaten during the entire three days. His disciples, however, questioned, “Whence should we have so much bread in the wilderness, as to fill so great a multitude?” Like many of us, the disciples saw only what was lacking. “And Jesus saith unto them, How many loaves have ye? And [the disciples] said, Seven, and a few little fishes. “And [Jesus] commanded the multitude to sit down on the ground. “And he took the seven loaves and the fishes, and gave thanks, and brake them, and gave to his disciples, and the disciples to the multitude.” Notice that the Savior gave thanks for what they had—and a miracle followed: “And they did all eat, and were filled: and they took up of the broken meat that was left seven baskets full.” We have all experienced times when our focus is on what we lack rather than on our blessings. Said the Greek philosopher Epictetus, “He is a wise man who does not grieve for the things which he has not, but rejoices for those which he has.” Gratitude is a divine principle. The Lord declared through a revelation given to the Prophet Joseph Smith: “Thou shalt thank the Lord thy God in all things. … “And in nothing doth man offend God, or against none is his wrath kindled, save those who confess not his hand in all things.” In the Book of Mormon we are told to “live in thanksgiving daily, for the many mercies and blessings which [God] doth bestow upon you.” Regardless of our circumstances, each of us has much for which to be grateful if we will but pause and contemplate our blessings.

The Divine Gift of Gratitude

Gratitude, combined with faith can bring about miraculous events, including healing. I still have a long ways to go, but I’ve gone almost a year without a MAJOR relapse into eating patterns, gaming, or pornographic pursuits. I’ve had micro relapses but nothing compared to my past addictions. I could not have made it this far without Jesus Christ and His infinite sacrifice through The Atonement. Gratitude is one way to combat these patterns.

I could not have made it this far without the Saviors merits, mercy, and grace. I could not have done this without The Lord and all those people he has placed in my life to help me along my way. I would be a completely different person without my Lord, my God. My Redeemer. The truths I have learned through the restored gospel of Jesus Christ have given me the direction to take, one step at a time.

I am grateful for the knowledge I have gained, the experiences, the trials, and hardships. They have brought me to my knees and have brought me closer to my Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ. They have brought me closer to my family and relationships that uplift and inspire. I have worked on making reconciliation in many relationships and have been working to right wrongs that I didn’t realize needed addressing until going through another one of the Church’s Programs, The Emotional Resilience Course.

EMOTIONAL RESILIENCE

My cousin Audrey and I have been working on the emotional resilience course through the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints too. This has been a huge help. Yesterday here’s what we covered:

You are a child of God. He is the Father of your spirit. Spiritually you are of noble birth, the offspring of the King of Heaven. Fix that truth in your mind and hold to it” (Boyd K. Packer, “To Young Women and Men,” Ensign, May 1989, 54).

“Be careful how you characterize yourself. Don’t characterize or define yourself by some temporary quality. The only single quality that should characterize us is that we are a son or daughter of God. That fact transcends all other characteristics, including race, occupation, physical characteristics, honors, or even religious affiliation” (Dallin H. Oaks, “How to Define Yourself,” New Era, June 2013, 48).

“You are unique. One of a kind, made of the eternal intelligence which gives you claim upon eternal life.
“Let there be no question in your mind about your value as an individual. The whole intent of the gospel plan is to provide an opportunity for each of you to reach your fullest potential, which is eternal progression and the possibility of godhood” (Spencer W. Kimball, “Privileges and Responsibilities of Sisters,” Ensign, Nov. 1978, 105).

My Foundation: Our Divine Identity and Purpose

MY TESTIMONY

I know as I remember the truth that I am a child of God and that everyone around me are children of God, a loving Heavebly Father, then I can begin to change my patterns of self-objectification and objectifying others. We are not objects to be acted upon. We are human beings with hearts and souls with divine worth and potential. As I remember these truths I can see others as they really are and I can see myself as a true daughter of a Heavenly King who loves me infinitely and truly wants whats best for me, but I mist choose. It is my choice. A choice a make daily to either follow after truth and light, or to turn away from the Savior. Many times, I turn away! But because of the gift of repentance and because of Jesus Christ, I can change! Glory glory hallelujah I can change!

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord;
He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored.
He hath loosed the fateful lightning of his terrible, swift sword;
His truth is marching on.


[Chorus]
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.


2. He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat;
He is sifting out the hearts of men before his judgment seat.
Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer him; be jubilant my feet!
Our God is marching on.


[Chorus]
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.


3. In the beauty of the lilies, Christ was born across the sea,
With a glory in his bosom that transfigures you and me.
As he died to make men holy, let us live to make men free,
While God is marching on.


[Chorus]
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
Glory, glory, hallelujah!
His truth is marching on.


Text: Julia Ward Howe, 1819–1910
Music: Anon., ca. 1861


Alma 5:50
Doctrine and Covenants 65:1–6

Battle Hymn of the Republic

God is truth. God is light. God is love. As I have trusted Him, and let Him direct my path, my joy is fuller, my happiness is more glorious, And my life is more uplifting and fulfilling. I promise that if you look to God, even if you can no more than desire to believe to know the truth for yourself, God will guide you. Just pray. I promise He is there. I promise He is listening. If it weren’t true. I would not be here today! God lives! He will hear you and answer your prayer if you but ask in faith, nothing wavering, to know the direction you must take to follow after truth. I promise if you ask God, our eternal Father in the name of His only begotten son, Jesus Christ, in faith, he will answer your prayer.

In the sacred name of My Lord and Savior, He who is most divine, most Holy, even Jesus Christ, Amen.

Step 1: A Story of Honesty

Feb 27th, 2021

I love the ARP videos. They remind me that others who struggle with addiction overcame it one step at a time through Jesus Christ and His infinite atonement which provides a way for healing, mercy, justice, and grace.

Somehow, I’m still here. Still struggling, yet, I believe I can be healed. Why? Because I’ve come so far. I’ve overcome so much. I make hundreds of mistakes each day, but I know as I’m honest to what I know is true and keep trying, keep believing, and keep repenting I will draw closer to the Savior and become who I truly desire to become, and it is through the enabling power of Jesus Christ’s atonement I will be able to withstand temptation for a minute longer. Even if it’s just for a second longer than before, I’ve progressed.